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Sunday, July 22, 2018

BIBB OR BUTTER LEAF


A wonderful friend called and asked if I could use some free lettuce. [As FREE is my favorite word, you now know why I described the friend as "wonderful"] 

A truck was stalled and the refer unit was out and could not deliver the load of lettuce on time; the distribution center refused to take it as the refer unit had been out. The produce company instructed the driver to dump the lettuce.

Fortunately, my friend was called and she was able to get 3 crates. How many in a crate, you might ask.  There were 24 heads to a crate. My friend delivered a crate to my house. Thank goodness we have an extra refrigerator in the garage.

I immediately put the word out to family and friends--FREE lettuce--I now have 6 heads left.

When my friend called, I assumed it would be iceberg lettuce, but when I looked in the refrigerator, I said, "WOW, it's Bibb, I love Bibb." Les pointed to the label and said, "No, it's BUTTER LEAF." I said, "It sure looks like Bib." He said, "Your first indication that it's NOT Bibb is the label on the crate." I said, "I've had butter leaf lettuce when I've bought bags of mixed lettuces, [Yes, I said LETTUCES] but this looks like Bibb." He said, "Just admit that you don't know EVERYTHING in the world--it's butter leaf--NOT Bibb!"

Of course I had to check on google and guess what? "Butter leaf" and "butter head" lettuces are also known as BOSTON BIBB.

So there, Les!

PRODUCE PICKS: Butter Leaf Lettuce
By–Michael R. Marks

For many people, digesting lettuce salads is tough, especially as they get older. So for many older diners, lettuce salad is no longer on the menu.

Whenever George Burns entered a restaurant, his first question was,“Do you have butter-leaf?” Chefs who served Burns knew that when he walked in, the butter-leaf came out of their walk-in. That's because butter-leaf is the easiest of all lettuces to digest.

Cut a head of butter-leaf lettuce in half and you will know how it got its name – from the buttery yellow color inside. It's also marketed as butter lettuce, butterhead, Bibb, Boston or limestone lettuce.

You can also find it still “alive,” hydroponically grown, which I love. The leaves are soft, and the flavor is delicate and sweet. Field-grown butter-leaf retails for about 99 cents to $1.49 a head. The hydroponic lettuce will cost about $3.99, but it lasts a long, long time. You will never have to throw lettuce away again.

Saturday, July 21, 2018

FAIRLY CRINGING

CRINGE: MORE FAYETTE COUNTY TALK FROM THE FAYETTE COUNTY FAIR.

Sitting in the Fayette County Democrats booth, I was not surprised to hear a number of politically-associated cringe-worthy items.

INTERPRETATE rather than INTERPRET

CANNIDATE rather than CANDIDATE
FEDRAL rather than FEDERAL
ELECTORIAL rather than ELECTORAL
FISICAL rather than FISCAL
UPMOST rather than UTMOST
SUPREMIST rather than SUPREMACIST
PEROGATIVE rather than PREROGATIVE
MUTE rather than MOOT
HIARKY rather than HIERARCHY

Friday, July 20, 2018

CRINGING AT THE FAIR



My friend Vivian reminded me that I had not published a "CRINGE--FAYETTE COUNTY TALK" article in awhile.

It certainly hasn't been because I haven't heard plenty.  Being at the Fair this week has brought a wealth of material!

Someone said VICE-A VERSA rather than VICE VERSA.

FLUSTRATED--I haven't heard that in awhile.

MANGO-- rather than green bell pepper.

CLEMATIS--someone tried to correct my pronunciation!

TOWARDS instead of toward.

FOR SURE (pronounced as one word FERSHURE)

Thursday, July 19, 2018

JUBILEE

From Mona Lisa:


Wednesday, July 18, 2018

I AM NOT RESIGNED


A good friend called and when she heard my raspy voice (because of my having a cold), she cautioned me by saying: "It gives a lovely light." She didn't need to use the complete quote as we are usually simpatico and engage in verbal shorthand; I knew she was referring to an Edna St. Vincent Millay poem:


"My candle burns at both ends,
It will not last the night,
But, oh, my foes, and oh, my friends,
It gives a lovely light."

What a nice reminder to take care of myself.

We recited the poem together.

We spoke about how, as teenagers, we adored Millay. She asked, "Do you think anybody still reads her?" I said, "There's a Millay Society." She asked, "I wonder if we loved her so much because she was a feminist and free-thinker or because she was a great poet?" I said, "Well, you know what Thomas Hardy said--the two greatest things about America--skyscrapers and Millay!" She said, "Well, she's not in the GREAT category like Yeats."

I asked, "Remember Mort Sahl?" She said, "Wow, you DIGRESS!" I said, "No, he said, "They quoted Edna St. Vincent Millay, but they believed Henry Kaiser." She wailed, "How the Hell do you remember these things?" I asked, "How many times could you ever have a quote by Sahl about Millay?"

She said, "I think I'll drag out Dirge Without Music; I haven't heard it since you had it recited at a funeral."

Simultaneously, we both began to say, "And I am not resigned." 

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

HONEYMOONERS


Remember when Jackie Gleason (as Ralph Kramden)in an exasperated mannert, would say to Audrey Meadows (as Alice Kramden), "One of these days, POW, right to the moon, Alice!", gesturing as if he were going to hit her, and she would answer, "Right in the kisser!"

Why did we think an expression of domestic violence was funny? Precisely because everyone could share his exasperation and we also knew he would NEVER do it!

Whenever I cause Gerald or Les to become exasperated with me, Les will show the Ralph Kramden "POW!" gesture and say, "A LUNAR EXCURSION, Alice!"